Student Success Spotlight with Kai Davis

by Gina Horkey on Jan 23, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

Today we have our second student success spotlight with Kai Davis. It’s our hope that we’re able to share a different story each week of how a past student has been able to significantly grow their freelance business by applying the concepts they learned from Double Your Freelancing (check out our first with Josh Brown). If you feel your story would be a good fit, share why!

Who are you and what’s your business?

I’m Kai Davis, an Outreach Consultant in Oregon. I work with brands who sell products online and help them increase their sales. Typical outcomes for my clients include more traffic, more leads, more sales and an improved image.

Student Success Spotlight with Josh Brown

by Gina Horkey on Jan 16, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

Today we have our first student success spotlight. It’s our hope that we’re able to share a different story each week of how a past student has been able to significantly grow their freelance business by applying the concepts they learned from Double Your Freelancing. Thanks Josh for being our guinea pig and sharing your story! To share your story, click here.

Brennan received this email last week:

“Just wanted to let you know that thanks to you, your newsletter, your books, and your consultancy masterclass, I had a great year last year. My business did 50% more in revenue in 2014 than in 2013, profit was excellent, and there’s no way I could’ve done that without you. Oh, and did I mention that I also took 7 weeks off when we had a new baby? Seriously, you helped me to have a great year last year – my best one yet.” ~Josh Brown

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“We believe in protecting the earth. We just happen to make great software.”

Should You Ever Work For Free?

by Brennan Dunn on Jan 15, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

“This will be huge for your portfolio.”

“If this works out, it’ll lead to a lot of paid work from us.”

We’ve all been approached by people who want free work. Sometimes it’s your mom (which means you should probably do some pro bono work for her — she’s done substantially more for you!), but more than often it’s a company.

What I’m going to focus on today is why some companies try to get us to do free work for them. But I also want to talk about why sometimes it makes a ton of sense to give stuff away for free — but with a twist.

4 Mistakes Freelancers Make When Selling Themselves

by Brennan Dunn on Jan 9, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

You’ve probably heard that you should always be selling. It doesn’t matter if you’re sporting a suit and tie at a conference pre-party or chatting business with a fellow parent at a kid’s birthday party: if the person you’re talking with could end up either hiring you or referring you to others, you better sell yourself to them.

And this is good advice. You should be “selling” yourself. Human relationships are forged on people selling themselves to others. (I had to sell myself to my college’s admissions office. I had to sell myself to every boss, client, and customer I ever worked with. I had to sell myself as a potential boyfriend, and later husband, to my wife).

But I think this advice can often lead people to think that selling is a win-or-lose game. That your job is to create a positive impression as quickly as possible, make your pitch before whoever you’re talking to becomes disinterested, and go in for the kill — I mean, the sale.

My Year In Review For 2014

by Brennan Dunn on Dec 29, 2014, — Get free updates of new posts here

Summary: My business did about $447,000 this year with close to $250k in unexpected or unavoidable expenses, and another $50k or so in business overhead.

At first, this might seem like the most depressing annual review you’ll read this year. It starts pretty shitty, but it ends well — and further drives home just how blessed I am to be able to work for myself and make more money on my terms, rather than at the whim of an employer.

This year didn’t start out too great

I’m often labeled a perpetual optimist.

Every year, at around this time, I create lots of lists. I try to list out where I want to be at the end of the next year, and then I work backward to deconstruct these goals into concrete milestones.

So going into 2014, I had a lot of goals in mind: I’d rewrite, redo, and relaunch my flagship course, Double Your Freelancing Rate. I’d recruit a team to work with me on Planscope. I’d systematize and automate the gaps in my business — namely, my Consultancy Masterclass, the Freelancers Guild, and more. And I’d finally figure out this whole work/life balance thing.

…And then, just weeks into the new year, I learned that my wife was going to need to go away for 6 weeks. Now, I’m no stranger to this sort of thing, but as I was riding the high of the new year, it upset me. It wasn’t the hospitalization that necessarily was upsetting; rather, it was that something I had zero control over was derailing me, my business, and everything I had planned.

Show 5 older articles →topics include productized consulting, business, pricing
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