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The Business of Freelancing, Episode 29: Marcus Blankenship on Managing Subcontractors

by craig on Jun 29, 2015, — Get free updates of new podcast episodes here

This is the Business of Freelancing Podcast, Episode 29. Today we’ll discuss a number of thoughts related to hiring subcontractors.  My guest is coach, advisor, project manager and author Marcus Blankenship.  If you’ve ever found yourself in the position of needing to hire and manage others,  then this podcast will definitely resonate.

I’m very close to launching my new daily question and answer podcast/YouTube show, called Freelance Answers.  This will be a great way to share the questions that a lot of you have asked and delve into a variety of topics that come up in my discussions with readers of the blog.

You can find out more about the new show and submit your questions at doubleyourfreelancing.com/answers.   Stay tuned to my newsletter to find out when the new show will be released.

At one time I thought that when it came to hiring subcontractors all you really needed to do was hire smart people.  It’s actually not that easy.  The idea of a self-managing employee is a fallacy and puts very unrealistic expectations on the person you hire.

There are some ways to set up yourself and your subcontractor to succeed:

  • Be realistic about communication.  When hiring you will need to explain in great detail what you need.
  • It is impossible to over-communicate.  We outline some ways that you and your subcontractors can communicate on a very frequent basis.
  • Answer your subcontractor’s questions quickly.
  • Know that you might have to face a client who questions having a subcontractor do their work instead of you.  We discuss some ways to handle those situations.
  • You are the person who assumes all risk and you are responsible for reviewing the work before it gets to the client.
  • Give feedback.  This is an important subject and we discuss how that feedback needs to be delivered.

Marcus has outstanding coaching experience and tons of great ideas.  You can connect with him on his website at marcusblankenship.com.

If you liked today’s podcast, could I please nudge you into a review leave a review for the show in iTunes?  If you have any suggestions or thoughts about the show, please contact me on my website at doubleyourfreelancing.com/contact.

 

 

How To Get New Clients With Facebook Ads

by Brennan Dunn on Jun 26, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

One of my first marketing experiments after opening up my agency’s office in downtown Norfolk, Virginia was to setup a Facebook ad campaign advertising our web design and development services.

Fast forward a few hundred dollars in budget… and you can probably guess what happened next.

I shut down the campaigns.

The clicks we did get (which weren’t many) weren’t leading to new leads. It was a waste of money.

I wrote off the idea of paid advertising, and instead focused on building up a grassroots network of referral sources.

Well, my decision to steer clear of ads obviously worked. We were able to make do without paying for leads.

But a few months ago, somebody asked me if I’d reconsider paid advertising for finding clients after hearing about the runaway success I’ve had advertising my email course, Charge What You’re Worth.

My response was that if I could go back in time knowing what I know now about Facebook ads, I would. Here’s why:

Student Success Story with Judy H. Wright

by Gina Horkey on Jun 26, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

We’re continuing to share a different story each week of how a past student has been able to significantly grow their freelance business by applying the concepts they learned from Double Your Freelancing (check out last week’s with William Durkin). 

If you feel your story would be a good fit, share why.

Screenshot 2015-06-19 at 12.17.23 PM

Judy Helm Wright owns a publishing company, Artichoke Press and recently launched Death of My Pet, which is in the “pet grief” niche. Judy’s also been a speaker and trainer on family relationships for the last 25 years.

What got you into freelancing? Was it what you expected?

I am a creative, intuitive wise woman who likes to learn and earn in various ways.

We have owned a number of small businesses and found that I really did not like to boss people around. I expected them to have the same work ethic and drive I did. I wanted them to be as committed to my ideas as I was.

However, when I was working in Corporate America, I found that I really hated being bossed around. I was a lousy employee and was much like the ones who had worked for me.

“It didn’t take long for me to see that I needed to be my own boss and be my only employee.”

The defining factor was walking to the mailbox with our son one day after dealing with irate customers for a company who was paying me big bucks but not dealing ethically with the customers. Andy was telling me a story of the unfairness of a soccer coach and I said “Andy, I have been dealing with problems all day, why can’t we just walk?” He said, “Okay Mom, who do you want your son to tell his problems to, the lunch lady?”

“I went in to work the next day and resigned. It was very clear that what I gained in salary I was losing in spirit and soul.”

The Business of Freelancing, Episode 28: How Matt Olpinski 15x His Project Income and Quit His Job

by craig on Jun 22, 2015, — Get free updates of new podcast episodes here

Welcome to the Business of Freelancing Podcast. My guest today is Double Your Freelancing student Matt Olpinski.

Before we jump into the interview, I want to share that in addition to this show I’m going to soon begin producing a daily question and answer podcast, called Freelance Answers.  This will be a great way to share the questions that a lot of you have and show the variety of topics that come up in my discussions with readers of the blog.  Checkout the new #FreelanceAnswers page to learn more about the show.

In this episode of The Business of Freelancing, I catch up with Matt as he is preparing for his last day of work at his job and his first day of full time freelancing.  Matt designs custom web and mobile solutions that grow startups and small businesses.  While he worked as a freelancer through college and beyond, Matt now finds himself in the position of a full time freelancer.

Student Success Story with William Durkin

by Gina Horkey on Jun 19, 2015, — Get free updates of new posts here

We’re continuing to share a different story each week of how a past student has been able to significantly grow their freelance business by applying the concepts they learned from Double Your Freelancing (check out last week’s with James Dixon). 

If you feel your story would be a good fit, share why.

William Durkin offers SQL server consulting. He’s been in business since the summer of 2014, but has kept it very low-key and spent the majority of his time concentrating on his full-time job. He’s got a great story to share, which I’m sure a lot of you side hustlers that are still working for the man can relate to!

“Running it this way has meant that I am limiting myself in the development of my business, but I want to be able to walk before I can run.”

What got you into freelancing? And was it what you expected?

I began speaking at technical conferences a few years ago and participated in industry specific forums, which led to people asking me if I was for hire. As I am a full-time employee at the moment, I’m only really working freelance on the side.

The conference speaking convinced me that I had the necessary skills to be able to freelance, so I thought I’d start saying “yes” to some of the requests. So far, the engagements have been small projects, but that is a good “foot in the door” to possibly taking the next step into full-time freelancing.

What’s been most challenging thus far?

The most challenging aspect has been actually ramping up prospecting and communicating that I’m available for work without being explicit. Because I am in full-time employment, I really don’t want to get into a sticky situation with my employer.

“I have turned down more work than I have accepted.”

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